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Online dating scams examples

Online dating scams and how to avoid them,Let's try a deep search.

 · Because the bot isn’t a human operator, typically, these are some of the easiest types of scams to spot. Bot scams usually have photos that are pulled from the internet and  · Common things online dating scammers do that you should look out for: 1. Asks you to communicate outside of the dating app or social site you’re on. Good evening  · 7 Examples of Online Dating Scammer Photos Used Often. Jenni Walker August 29, Category: Dating Scams, Romance Scams, Tips. Internet scammers steal photos of Regardless of platform or app – Facebook catfish scams, Instagram dating scams, Plenty of Fish scams, Snapchat meetup scams, and so on – warning signs of online dating scams Another online dating scam that you might come across is ticket scam. Once they gain your trust, they will talk about their plans to travel and how they already have tickets going there. The ... read more

They will pretend that they are on a business trip in Ghana or Nigeria and pretend that they got into an accident. There will also be instances that they will pretend that a family member got diagnosed with a serious illness and would need your financial help.

Some of them will pretend that they are asking for donations that can be given to charities and such. Once you send them any amount of money, you will never hear from them again. He will ask for your financial assistance so he can bribe the prison guards and let him be free. This is also similar to other types of scams, including the Spanish Prisoner and Nigerian money offer. The money that they will be talking about is millions of dollars, diamonds, and even gold bullion.

Once you send them the needed amount, they will ask for more and come up with some excuses that something came up and more money will be required.

After sending that money, you will never hear from them again. Another online dating scam that you might come across is ticket scam. Once they gain your trust, they will talk about their plans to travel and how they already have tickets going there.

The problem is that something related to their family or business came up and that they need to sell their ticket. They will even send you a photo of the ticket that they are talking about. Once you send the money, they will either disappear or send you a ticket, which you will later find out is fake.

It will already be too late once you realize that what you got is fake. The frustrating thing about this is that there is no way to get your money back. Another online dating scam is that they will try to steal your information.

This is by sending you emails, asking you to click on them so you can check their photos. You may see pictures, but you will never know that they already got into your computer. Once all these are stolen, they will use it for different purposes. Some of the things where these scammers can use your information are by getting loans under your name, getting your emails, and packages, or even by gaining access to your home. Identity theft is really dangerous, so always be wary.

If you are afraid of being scammed, it is extremely important to perform a quick background check on the person you are actually speaking to on the internet you can do that here.

The questions that come to mind are:. To help the users of RomanceScams. org, we have partnered with BeenVerified so you can check exactly that. This service reveals everything about this potential scammer and if they are a real person! If you have any doubt about who you are speaking to… Please make sure to use this service! They just need to send a wire transfer or money order upfront to pay for some equipment or educational materials before they can get started, but these never arrive, and there is no actual job.

Some scammers spend a fair amount of time creating official-looking emails from reputable service providers. They tell the target that the account is about to be suspended and that they need to provide information to keep it open. Netflix customers were recently hit by such a scam. This one is more targeted toward businesses. The scammer identifies the person within a company that has control over funds. They then pose as someone with authority such as the CEO, and request money be transferred to a specified account.

This type of phishing requires some preparation because the scammer needs to act convincingly like the executive he or she is purporting to be. The fraudster will then contact someone in the company who has the authority to move money and direct that person to transfer funds to the scammer.

Therefore, many CEO phishers will zero in on new members of the finance department in the hopes that person does not yet know all the safeguards that may be in place to prevent the scam from working. Read more on CEO fraud here. The email poses as a greeting card e-card from a friend or family member and encourages you to click a link.

Once you do, the malware is automatically downloaded and installed on your system. Affinity fraud refers to when someone uses a common interest or belief such as religion to lure you in. It often happens in person, especially within religious communities, but can be conducted via email too.

In this take on the advanced fee scam, you are told that you are pre-approved for a loan or credit card but that you just need to pay some processing fees.

It could be a small amount but fraudsters might be looking for bank account info more so than the money itself. This one often targets businesses and involves an email containing an invoice for legitimate-sounding services. A sense of urgency is used to convince the receiver that they need to pay immediately or risk having the case transferred to a collections agency.

Yes, believe it or not, this one pops up regularly in spam folders. You just need to send over some personal details before you can start collecting your compensation. While many types of internet fraud can target virtually anyone with access to a computer, many are crafted specifically with the elderly in mind.

Seniors are often targeted for identity theft since they are perceived as being more susceptible to certain scams. Here are some of the most common forms of elder fraud but you can find more about detecting and reporting these scams in our elder fraud article.

Elderly people seeking to invest are often looking for short-term lucrative projects to supplement their retirement income. Investment scams simply promise fantastic returns in order to get seniors to hand over their money. The insurance scam plays on the assumption that seniors might be less focused on what they have now and more so on what they will leave behind for loved ones. This type of scheme might involve a phone call or email persuading the senior that they need an annuity or life insurance policy.

Often the insurance firm is completely made up, but insurance scams are actually sometimes carried out by legitimate agents, including one who has been caught multiple times.

As people age, health tends to be more likely to deteriorate and the need for prescription medication can become expensive. Many online pharmacies have stepped in to offer drugs and other healthcare at lower than average prices. The problem is, most of these sites do not operate within the law or follow standard practices. For example, the founder of Canada Drugs is wanted in the US for selling counterfeit medicines, but the website is still very much up and running. Without proper regulation, consumers really have no way of knowing what they are getting or if they will receive anything at all.

This one is technically a form of vishing and involves someone calling a grandparent and posing as their grandchild who needs money urgently. Extortion scams follow the basic premise that you need to hand over money urgently or face a predefined consequence, whether it be real or fabricated. Extortion schemes can be simple or extraordinarily complex, depending on the imagination of the perpetrator involved. Ransomware is a type of malware that involves an attacker encrypting your files with the promise of decrypting them only in return for a fee.

One of the most notorious cases of ransomware was the WannaCry attack in which more than , machines were infected. Backing up files regularly can help protect you against the threat of ransomware. In this form of extortion , victims are typically lured into sharing intimate photos or videos, often through online dating sites or social media.

They may even be prompted to perform explicit acts while being secretly filmed. They are then asked to pay a fee to prevent the photos or videos from being released.

This terrifying scam involves threats of physical violence and even death, usually sent via email. The claim is often that the person sending the email has been hired to kill you and will relinquish their role in exchange for a fee. Emails might include personal details garnered from social media or other sources to make them seem even more threatening.

Aside from going after your money, some scammers also try to obtain your personal information for use in identity theft. Again, the basic premise is that your life will be spared only if you pay up. Another one playing on the fear of recent world events is the bomb threat scam. This is an email telling people that there is a bomb planted in their building and it can be disconnected only if a certain fee is paid.

Distributed Denial of Service DDoS attacks are similar to ransomware attacks, except that instead of file encryption you often have whole websites or internet services taken down. Web servers hosting these sites and services are flooded with dummy traffic that overwhelms them, slowing the site down to a crawl or even shutting it down altogether.

Victims are instructed to pay a fee to gain back control over the service. Businesses are often prime targets for this type of attack. This is the act of tricking you into providing some kind of information that is later used to scam you. The odds of pulling off a successful scam are low, so the pool of potential victims has to be very large. The easiest way to contact a large number of people with almost no effort is through email.

In a dedicated phishing post , we look at how to avoid or repair the damage done by common phishing scams, some of which are explained below. Spear phishing is very targeted and the perpetrator typically knows some of your details before they strike. This could be information gleaned from social media, such as recent purchases and personal info, including where you live. A phishing email or message might be crafted based on those details, asking for more information including payment details or passwords.

This is geared toward businesses and targets high-level executives within corporations who have access to the email accounts of someone in authority. Once they have access to that email account, they can use it for other means such as accessing employee information or ordering fraudulent wire transfers see also: CEO fraud.

Cases have involved :. The email might be from an actual or spoofed executive account or might appear to be from the IRS or an accounting firm. Once provided, the documents give criminals everything they need for identity theft. This way criminals can get an increased payload for their efforts. Voice phishing vishing scams are not really online scams, but they are often linked and are becoming more sophisticated so are worth mentioning here.

They use voice solicitation to get information or money from consumers or businesses. The scammer calls the victim and attempts to use social engineering techniques to trick the victim into doing something, often to give credit or debit card details or send money. Sending email spam and SMS spam is very easy and costs almost nothing.

Calling an intended victim personally, on the other hand, takes more time and effort. While phone calls are more expensive than email, Voice over IP VoIP has made mass calling far more accessible to criminals.

To make matters worse, it is almost trivial to spoof a caller ID number these days. Scammers will typically pose as a financial institution representative and tell you there has been suspected fraud or suspicious activity on your account. While some will then try to extract personal or bank account information, other scammers have different tactics. The first contact via phone may be automated meaning scammers can reach a huge number of targets very easily.

It also means they only have to actually speak with anyone who calls back. See more tax scams. Fake prize or contest winnings are often communicated via a phone call or automated voice message. Promised prizes could be in the form of cash, a car, or an all-expenses-paid vacation. In reality, fraudsters are looking to find out personal details including your address and social security number for use in credit card fraud or identity theft.

The tech support scam often starts as a phone call and ultimately ends up online, similar to the bank scam mentioned above. Once you do, the fake tech can do whatever they want with your system, including installing malware or ransomware. They then have all of your payment info and in some cases can continue to access your computer through the remote access software whenever they want.

The popup is usually difficult to get rid of which serves as motivation to call the number provided. Criminals prey on this fear and often pose as police or government officers to phish for personal information. Bear in mind, any such legitimate contact would be dealt with in person or at the very least by mail. While many of the other scams on this list could potentially be carried out through social media, a few very specific ones have popped up on social platforms.

Scammers capitalize by posting ads for such a feature. This scam involves a clickbait-style headline on Facebook relaying some fake celebrity news, such as the death of a well-known star or a new relationship in Hollywood. They can then reach out to your friends and family with friend or follow requests and once connected, pose as you.

These trusted connections can then be used for a whole host of purposes such as spreading malware or requesting money for made-up scenarios.

One app released in called InstLike asked for usernames and passwords in return for follows and likes. In fact, they simply collected the credentials of , users and turned them into participants in a large social botnet. Basically, the app did deliver on its promise but used the accounts of those who signed up to do so. A job offer scam might be run through email, but is commonly conducted through professional networking site LinkedIn. In some cases, these can lead to scams whereby you become the middleman for transferring funds.

Many people purchase airline tickets, hotel rooms, and even entire vacation packages online these days. Scammers know this and there has been a rise in fraudulent travel sites selling fake tickets and non-existent vacations.

Travel is usually a big-ticket item, which spells big bucks for criminals. There may be no record of you having a booking at all. These scams may be initiated via phone or email, but typically the target is told that they have won a vacation. In order to claim, they either have to pay a small fee advanced fee scam or provide credit card details for a deposit. In the former case, the thief takes off with the money.

In the latter, the credit card details can be used in credit card fraud. In this case, someone posts an ad claiming that they have purchased a ticket for a trip they can no longer go on. They then sell the fake tickets for a much lower price than their face value. With insurance company agencies making it so difficult to get refunds on tickets, the fact that someone might be selling tickets online is made more believable, fueling the success of the scam.

In a points scam, the target is called or emailed and informed that they have won a huge number of points, through a travel points card program or a travel credit card points scheme. All they have to do is provide some details to confirm the transaction. This may include account information, credit card details, or other personal information. The vacation rental scam involves fraudsters posting ads for property in desirable locations for bargain prices.

The victim is required to send a deposit or the full amount upfront. Criminals look to exploit both taxpayers and the government using a range of tax-related scams. In a fake audit scam, targets are contacted by someone claiming to be from the IRS or similar tax agency and told that an audit has identified a discrepancy. Oddly, in Canada, it is reported that many of these particular scams involve payment requests via iTunes gift cards. This one targets people who are expecting a tax refund.

Again, criminals pose as the IRS or similar agency and prompt targets to click a link through which they can claim their refund. However, the link leads to a phishing site where the victim is asked to provide personal information such as their social security number and banking details, which can be used in identity theft. This scam is a bit more sophisticated as it actually uses real client details stolen from accounting firms via hacking or phishing. The information is used to file a fake tax refund request which is processed by the IRS, and the client receives the refund amount.

The scammer then poses as the IRS or a collection agency, tells the client the refund was issued in error, and demands the money be returned. Of course, the payment is directed toward the fraudster, not the IRS. This case spells double trouble for the client.

Not only are they short their refund, but they could also be in hot water with the IRS for supposedly filing a false claim. However, the victim can be negatively impacted as failing to pay taxes can result in a conviction, including fines and imprisonment. Indeed, there are so many methods for scammers to choose from, and scams and hacks involving bitcoin and altcoins seem to be constantly in the news. One example of a blatantly fake coin exchange is Internet Coin Exchange which simply lists cryptocurrency price details alongside Buy buttons.

Other questionable operations include Igot , which later became Bitlio. Unfortunately, when exchanges are hacked by cybercriminals, both the exchange and its customers tend to lose out. This involves the organized promotion of a particular cryptocurrency, usually a relatively unknown coin. The mass investment causes the value to spike, encouraging other investors to get in on the action. Mining of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies typically involves using computational power to support the network in return for a reward.

Enter cloud mining companies, which enable you to invest in mining without having to actually deal with the setup yourself. Of course, where there are investors, there are scammers ready and waiting. Known as malicious cryptomining or cryptojacking , the malware is usually spread by a trojan virus. Infected computers then form a larger botnet that mines cryptocurrencies. An Initial Coin Offering ICO is a little like an Initial Public Offering IPO for a company, the major difference being the coin is really worthless until investors perceive value.

Investors are wooed with whitepapers and promises of superior security and broad application potential. They buy coins in exchange for fiat currency, hoping to get a return on their investment. ICOs in general are viewed as such a problem that China has banned them and other countries are imposing heavy regulation. For example, the legitimate Seele ICO had their Telegram channel hijacked by people posing as admins.

Investors were persuaded to pay for tokens before the sale had actually started and the funds were pocketed by the criminals. Austrian investment scheme Optioment promised a whopping 4 percent weekly return to some investors and ended up reportedly stealing more than 12, bitcoins.

Other suspicious schemes include BitConnect, which shut down after receiving multiple cease and desist letters, and OneCoin, a reported global Ponzi scheme that is still going strong. When a cryptocurrency forks and a new coin is created, it can be difficult to find a wallet that can accommodate the new coin. Enter scammers. When Bitcoin Gold was first released, the mybtgwallet. com website popped up, promoting users to hand over their private keys and subsequently lose their coins.

More impersonators are taking advantage of the cryptocurrency market, this time in the form of wallet clones. Criminals make people believe they are depositing their coins into a legitimate wallet but are actually keeping them for themselves. It used domains impersonating the reputable Blockchain. info and even used paid Google ads to attract more victims.

Coin-mixing services are used to mix coins in order to break the connection between the sender and receiver, making transactions more anonymous. While coin-mixing services can aid illegal activity, they can have legitimate use cases, too.

Popular sites include Bit Blender and the now-defunct Helix by Grams. These two were involved in a phishing scam on the dark web where a coin-mixing tutorial used links to fake websites for both of the services. Users following the steps and visiting the links simply handed over their coin to the thieves. Bitpetite ran a mixing operation but also asked for investors to hand over money with the promise of 4 percent daily returns!

This was clearly unattainable and the site disappeared in November after stealing an unknown amount from investors. Aside from all of the above, there are many more online scams to look out for.

The internet is the most widely used communication network ever constructed. There are positive and unpleasant things happening on the internet, and among the unpleasant things are ongoing attempts to scam innocent people out of their money or identities. The internet brings with it many such opportunities, and fraudsters appear to be waiting around every virtual corner with the latest in online scams.

While some forms of internet fraud have gotten very sophisticated, even some of the older, less advanced plays still actually work. If people know more about the types of scams taking place and what to look out for, we can hopefully save at least some people from getting swindled out of their hard-earned cash.

Related: Cybercrime stats and facts. Email scams are a type of online fraud. The broad strokes tend to remain the same, but the details of these types of online fraud change over time. There are resources to keep on top of the ever-changing scams, and steps to take to defend against them.

You would think that scam artists would have refined their approach by now, but many scam emails are poorly written and fairly easy to spot. Nonetheless, some are more sophisticated and people still lose a lot of money to email scams every year. See also: How to encrypt email. Whatever the subject, the email is requesting that you send a fee in advance before you can receive whatever is promised. The Nigerian scam is a variation of the advanced-fee scam but deserves its own spot since it has been so prevalent.

The scam started in Nigeria and violates penal code in the country, so is often referred to as a Nigerian scam. Charity scams simply play on the emotions of victims to persuade them to hand over donations to fake charities and organizations. Subjects might include puppies in danger or disaster relief efforts. The emails typically include some excuse as to why the matter is urgent and may include links to legitimate-looking websites.

Aside from sending money, victims may be handing over their debit card or credit card details to thieves. Working from home has so many draws and is a major lifestyle goal for many people. Scam artists capitalize on the dreams of these would-be remote workers by luring them with fantastic yet realistic-sounding work-at-home job opportunities. The catch? They just need to send a wire transfer or money order upfront to pay for some equipment or educational materials before they can get started, but these never arrive, and there is no actual job.

Some scammers spend a fair amount of time creating official-looking emails from reputable service providers. They tell the target that the account is about to be suspended and that they need to provide information to keep it open. Netflix customers were recently hit by such a scam. This one is more targeted toward businesses. The scammer identifies the person within a company that has control over funds.

They then pose as someone with authority such as the CEO, and request money be transferred to a specified account. This type of phishing requires some preparation because the scammer needs to act convincingly like the executive he or she is purporting to be. The fraudster will then contact someone in the company who has the authority to move money and direct that person to transfer funds to the scammer. Therefore, many CEO phishers will zero in on new members of the finance department in the hopes that person does not yet know all the safeguards that may be in place to prevent the scam from working.

Read more on CEO fraud here. The email poses as a greeting card e-card from a friend or family member and encourages you to click a link. Once you do, the malware is automatically downloaded and installed on your system. Affinity fraud refers to when someone uses a common interest or belief such as religion to lure you in.

It often happens in person, especially within religious communities, but can be conducted via email too. In this take on the advanced fee scam, you are told that you are pre-approved for a loan or credit card but that you just need to pay some processing fees. It could be a small amount but fraudsters might be looking for bank account info more so than the money itself. This one often targets businesses and involves an email containing an invoice for legitimate-sounding services.

A sense of urgency is used to convince the receiver that they need to pay immediately or risk having the case transferred to a collections agency. Yes, believe it or not, this one pops up regularly in spam folders. You just need to send over some personal details before you can start collecting your compensation. While many types of internet fraud can target virtually anyone with access to a computer, many are crafted specifically with the elderly in mind.

Seniors are often targeted for identity theft since they are perceived as being more susceptible to certain scams. Here are some of the most common forms of elder fraud but you can find more about detecting and reporting these scams in our elder fraud article. Elderly people seeking to invest are often looking for short-term lucrative projects to supplement their retirement income. Investment scams simply promise fantastic returns in order to get seniors to hand over their money.

The insurance scam plays on the assumption that seniors might be less focused on what they have now and more so on what they will leave behind for loved ones. This type of scheme might involve a phone call or email persuading the senior that they need an annuity or life insurance policy. Often the insurance firm is completely made up, but insurance scams are actually sometimes carried out by legitimate agents, including one who has been caught multiple times.

As people age, health tends to be more likely to deteriorate and the need for prescription medication can become expensive. Many online pharmacies have stepped in to offer drugs and other healthcare at lower than average prices. The problem is, most of these sites do not operate within the law or follow standard practices. For example, the founder of Canada Drugs is wanted in the US for selling counterfeit medicines, but the website is still very much up and running.

Without proper regulation, consumers really have no way of knowing what they are getting or if they will receive anything at all. This one is technically a form of vishing and involves someone calling a grandparent and posing as their grandchild who needs money urgently. Extortion scams follow the basic premise that you need to hand over money urgently or face a predefined consequence, whether it be real or fabricated.

Extortion schemes can be simple or extraordinarily complex, depending on the imagination of the perpetrator involved. Ransomware is a type of malware that involves an attacker encrypting your files with the promise of decrypting them only in return for a fee. One of the most notorious cases of ransomware was the WannaCry attack in which more than , machines were infected. Backing up files regularly can help protect you against the threat of ransomware. In this form of extortion , victims are typically lured into sharing intimate photos or videos, often through online dating sites or social media.

They may even be prompted to perform explicit acts while being secretly filmed. They are then asked to pay a fee to prevent the photos or videos from being released. This terrifying scam involves threats of physical violence and even death, usually sent via email. The claim is often that the person sending the email has been hired to kill you and will relinquish their role in exchange for a fee. Emails might include personal details garnered from social media or other sources to make them seem even more threatening.

Aside from going after your money, some scammers also try to obtain your personal information for use in identity theft. Again, the basic premise is that your life will be spared only if you pay up. Another one playing on the fear of recent world events is the bomb threat scam. This is an email telling people that there is a bomb planted in their building and it can be disconnected only if a certain fee is paid. Distributed Denial of Service DDoS attacks are similar to ransomware attacks, except that instead of file encryption you often have whole websites or internet services taken down.

Web servers hosting these sites and services are flooded with dummy traffic that overwhelms them, slowing the site down to a crawl or even shutting it down altogether. Victims are instructed to pay a fee to gain back control over the service.

Businesses are often prime targets for this type of attack. This is the act of tricking you into providing some kind of information that is later used to scam you. The odds of pulling off a successful scam are low, so the pool of potential victims has to be very large.

The easiest way to contact a large number of people with almost no effort is through email. In a dedicated phishing post , we look at how to avoid or repair the damage done by common phishing scams, some of which are explained below. Spear phishing is very targeted and the perpetrator typically knows some of your details before they strike. This could be information gleaned from social media, such as recent purchases and personal info, including where you live.

A phishing email or message might be crafted based on those details, asking for more information including payment details or passwords. This is geared toward businesses and targets high-level executives within corporations who have access to the email accounts of someone in authority.

Once they have access to that email account, they can use it for other means such as accessing employee information or ordering fraudulent wire transfers see also: CEO fraud. Cases have involved :. The email might be from an actual or spoofed executive account or might appear to be from the IRS or an accounting firm. Once provided, the documents give criminals everything they need for identity theft.

This way criminals can get an increased payload for their efforts. Voice phishing vishing scams are not really online scams, but they are often linked and are becoming more sophisticated so are worth mentioning here. They use voice solicitation to get information or money from consumers or businesses.

The scammer calls the victim and attempts to use social engineering techniques to trick the victim into doing something, often to give credit or debit card details or send money. Sending email spam and SMS spam is very easy and costs almost nothing. Calling an intended victim personally, on the other hand, takes more time and effort. While phone calls are more expensive than email, Voice over IP VoIP has made mass calling far more accessible to criminals.

To make matters worse, it is almost trivial to spoof a caller ID number these days. Scammers will typically pose as a financial institution representative and tell you there has been suspected fraud or suspicious activity on your account. While some will then try to extract personal or bank account information, other scammers have different tactics. The first contact via phone may be automated meaning scammers can reach a huge number of targets very easily.

10 Signs You’ve Been Scammed By An Online Dating Profile,These are the best matches based on the address you entered.

 · Common things online dating scammers do that you should look out for: 1. Asks you to communicate outside of the dating app or social site you’re on. Good evening  · Here’s our list of over 70 common online scams to be aware of: Email-based scams. Email scams are a type of online fraud. While it’s true that a fraudulent offer can be Romance scammers very commonly create extravagant excuses as to why they cannot meet your request. For example, if you ask him to video call you, he may say that his data Another online dating scam that you might come across is ticket scam. Once they gain your trust, they will talk about their plans to travel and how they already have tickets going there. The To understand the magnitude of online scams around the world, consider the following: Sources:,,, The 17 Most Common Online Scams Phishing. This is perhaps the most common  · Because the bot isn’t a human operator, typically, these are some of the easiest types of scams to spot. Bot scams usually have photos that are pulled from the internet and ... read more

This one targets people who are expecting a tax refund. This could be information gleaned from social media, such as recent purchases and personal info, including where you live. Online dating websites have made it easy for those looking to put themselves out there without having to go out and search; and it has given the ability to millions of people the capability to find long-lasting and meaningful relationships. Start Here. But as well as the successes, there are also online dating scams — and these are on the rise. Scam artists capitalize on the dreams of these would-be remote workers by luring them with fantastic yet realistic-sounding work-at-home job opportunities.

Read more of Chelsea's articles. This gives you the ability to really pay attention to their facial expressions and responses, online dating scams examples, thus giving you the ability to judge their responses and determine whether or not they may be using a script. Recommended Scam-Free Dating Online dating scams examples At RomanceScams. For this reason, set up a phone or video chat early on in your communications with an online love interest. Most dating scams start innocently enough. A phishing email or message might be crafted based on those details, asking for more information including payment details or passwords. Sending email spam and SMS spam is very easy and costs almost nothing.

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